Kathleen Williamson

nearfm.ie

"I love the sacred spud... the photo, the concept and the music" 

 17.30 Irish time on Mondays   Near90FM and it can be accessed live at www.nearfm.ie.

'Ar Mhuin na Muice' which means on the pigs back.

http://www.nearfm.ie/livestream.htm

 

various reviews

Kathleen Williamson[kgw1]                     
Sacred Spud
® Productions
PO Box 249
Tucson, AZ 85702
www.kathleenwilliamson.com 
MEDIA/PRESS PACKET
BIOGRAPHY

 

“Her ability as a writer and the overall intelligence of pieces like "I Can See the New View" will convince many to keep listening.” Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., All Music Guide

 

“Music is one thing. The music industry--ten thousand leagues away, where real music got drawn and quartered--is another. Yet in spite of the fuselage of rotten songs, one might, if lucky, hear melodies that honestly fit the words they sings about--not only fit, but enhance, underline, punctuate, or soothe, and in rare cases, even add the subtlety intended. Such a rare case will be found in Kathleen Williamson's latest CD, The Sacred Spud.”  Katie Lee

 

“Charming and nonformulaic…. Williamson is best when she defies convention and allows her subtle insights to infiltrate the listeners' consciousness.” Gene Armstrong, Tucson Weekly

 

 

            Sing Out Magazine wrote, “Williamson brings a new relevance to the word "eclectic." Kathleen Williamson continues to take Americana songwriting and indie music production up another notch with the release of her finely crafted CD, The Sacred Spud, featuring such wonderful accompanists as the legendary late Hal Rugg on pedal steel.  The Sacred Spud won the 2006 TAMMIES (Tucson Music Area Music Awards/Tucson Weekly) for Best CD, while Kathleen also took Best Songwriter and Best Folk Music Awards.

            Williamson’s “Love is Best of All,” 2003 CD of jazz, blues, and folk originals won awards such as Tucson TAMMIES awards for Best CD and Best Songwriter, Kathleen has received the 2004 and 2005 ASCAPlus Awards (American Society of Composers and Publishers) for the prestigious artistic value of her original compositions.  Kathleen, in a duo with Lisa Otey, also garnered the 2003 Arizona Blues Showdown and went to represent Arizona at the International Blues Competition in Memphis that year.  Kathleen’s compositions are included on several KXCI-FM CD compilations along with other folk artists such as Michelle Shocked and Calexico’s Joey Burns.  WBAI-FM’s Amy Goodman has twice featured Kathleen’s live music on Democracy Now! radio and television broadcasts.  Nancy McCallion included Kathleen’s rendition of the traditional Gartan Mother’s Lullaby on the 2005 Lullabies for New Beginnings, a non-profit CD compilation benefiting New Beginnings for Mothers and Children in Tucson.

            As a songwriter, singer and guitarist, Kathleen s career spans over three decades and around the world.  She began with folk and rock bands in her native New York City as a teenager.  In 1974, she moved to Jerome, Arizona, where she performed as a solo as well as a duo with her renowned mentors, Americana artist Katie Lee and jazz guitar legend Joe Wolverton. In 1978, she performed extensively in Ireland and won the prestigious Westport’s Cailin Deas Singing Pub Competition for her balladeering.  By the early 80s, Kathleen was one of Northern and Central Arizona’s most popular solo performing artists, delighting audiences with her energetic performances and unique musical diversity.  She relocated to Tucson in 1986 to study law and anthropology and quickly became a regular part of the Tucson music culture. While Kathleen maintained her solo act and songwriting, she also collaborated extensively with blues diva Lisa Otey, in the formation of Owl’s Nest Productions® record label and in their internationally acclaimed and award winning musical duo.  From 2005 through early 2007, Kathleen moved to New York, started her own Sacred Spud® Productions,  and pursued an LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law, focusing on Arts and Music Law.  She returned to Tucson in 2007 and is currently writing new songs for her upcoming “no-fi” basement release “Songs from Casa Shtetl” on her new digital download label, Authentically Cheap™ Records.  Kathleen will be touring in the Seattle area this 2009 summer.

 

Timeline Bio    Kathleen Williamson

1953 – Born in Bronx NY to Irish waitress mom and Bronx sailor dad. Three greatest sisters in the  world soon join her.  1970 – Youthful involvement in the late 60's and early 70s basement bands and NYC folk music  scene, influenced by contemporary folk, soul, jazz, and rock music.  1974 - Kathleen took her guitar to Jerome, Arizona, where she was further influenced by her  mentor and friend, the renowned folk indie pioneer  Katie Lee .  1978 – Kathleen toured Ireland for five months and won the prestigious Cailean Deas Balladeering  Competition in Westport, Mayo.  1978 - 1986 - Joined forces with the late legendary  Joe Wolverton , jazz guitar virtuoso and  teacher of Les Paul. Alongside her own successful solo act, she worked regularly with  Joe until 1986, touring in Japan, Guam, Hong Kong, Korea, and Samoa. During the  late 70s through the latter part of the 80s, Kathleen was one of the most popular  solo performing acts in Central and Northern Arizona.  1983 Headlined the first Guam Jazz Festival  1986 One of headline acts for first Tucson Folk Festival and has been a perennial since.  1988 – J.D. University of Arizona  1994 – Co-founded Owl’s Nest Productions, record label, with Lisa Otey.  2000 – Ph.D. Cultural Anthropology, University of Arizona.  1987 to 2005, Kathleen worked with blues diva  Lisa Otey  joining her in live and recorded  performances, as well as co-writing notable music, such as “I Can See the New  View,” and “Don’t Make a Scene, Kathleen.”  Since 2000, Kathleen increased her solo  performances both here and in Europe.  2003 - "I Can See the New View, " featured on KXCI-FM Tucson 2002 Folk Festival Collection  CD released in May 2003. 2003 - Williamson released her critically acclaimed and award winning debut CD, love is  best of all ( Owl's Nest Productions®), in Europe and in the United States.  2003 -  2003 TAMMIES BEST CD for Love is Best of All, BEST SONGWRITER  (Tucson Area Musicians Award  sponsored by the  Tucson Weekly) .   2004 – ASCAPlus Award (American Society of Composers and Publishers - granted to  support and encourage writers of serious music based on the unique prestige value  of each writer's catalog of original compositions and works performed substantially in  media not typically surveyed by ASCAP). 2004 – “The Stars Draw Near” featured on Amy Goodman's "Democracy Now !" 2004 -   "My Hometown," included in KXCI-FM CD compilation titled "One Song at a Time." 2005  "My Hometown," featured on Amy Goodman's "Democracy Now !"     2005 – August heralded Kathleen’s new CD, The Sacred Spud , (Owl’s Nest Productions).  A real toe-tapper, this Americana album seeks to "take back God, Country... (And  country music!)... from the evil doers!"   2005 – After 31 years in Arizona, Kathleen returns to New York City and begins her own   label  and music production company, Sacred Spud Productions™.  2005- ASCAPLUS award 2006 - Kathleen's rendition of the traditional Irish "Gartan Mother's Lullaby" is featured on a  compilation produced by  Nancy McCallion  to benefit non-profit New Beginnings for  Women and Children.   2006 – LL.M. Intellectual Property and Entertainment Law, Cardozo School of Law, NYC. 
2006 TAMMIES BEST CD for Sacred Spud, BEST SONGWRITER, BEST FOLK MUSIC (and runner up best female vocalist).

2006 to present: various appearances at local cafes, benefits, folk festivals, Pima County Women’s Commission ongoing concert series host up to 2013.  Ongoing arts and entertainment legal practice for not-so-rich arts and music producers and business startups. 

January 2012 – composed and performed score for Joanna Frueh’s Glamour of Being Real. See www.joannafrueh.com

May 2013 – composed, performed and recorded (at Kalapa Studios)score for Joanna Frueh’s Short Story About a Big Healing. See www.joannafrueh.com

2006-2010 – songwriting completed for upcoming LP – Songs from Casa Shtetl™.  Pending recording sessions.
2010-2013  songwriting for upcoming LP – Songs from Villa Grace™ – Pending recording sessions.

Ongoing - Building home studio (Kalapa Studios™) , learning Logic Pro, etc.,

2010 to to date/2013- Developing Villa Grace. Formed Villa Grace, LLC (an educational site for DYI arts, music, face to face socializing and creativity, and growing/husbanding organic foods and sustainable energy).   Hosted first songwriter circle in September 2013 with Christine Lavin and Julie Gold. 

 

DISCOGRAPHY

1983 – Kathleen Williamson. Irish Queen Live in Tokyo,  Irish Queen Productions.  Cassette. Out of Print

1986 – Kathleen Williamson. Prototype for an Album, Irish Queen Productions. Cassette.    Out of Print

1987 – Kathleen Williamson. The Joy of Gigging, Irish Queen Productions®. Cassette. Out    of Print. 

2002 – Kathleen Williamson. love is best of all. Owl’s Nest Productions®. 2003 TAMMIES    Best CD. www.cdbaby.com/kwilliamson 

2005 – Kathleen Williamson. The Sacred Spud. Owl’s Nest Productions®.      www.cdbaby.com/kwilliamson2   

2006 – Kathleen Williamson.  Kathleen’s Blues.  Sacred Spud® Productions (a compilation of only the blues songs from the Love and Spud albums).

COMPILATIONS, Recording APPEARANCES WITH OTHER ARTISTS and/or PRODUCTIONS

1994 – Lisa Otey.  Blame It On My Youth. CD. Owl’s Nest Productions®.      www.lisaotey.com  1996 – Lisa Otey. Blue Angel. CD. Owl’s Nest Productions®
1997 – Lisa Otey. Kitten on the Keys. CD. Owl’s Nest Productions®
1999 – Lisa Otey. Gimme Some a Yo’ Sugar.  CD. Owl’s Nest Productions®
2001 – Lisa Otey. Hard Workin’ Woman. CD. Owl’s Nest Productions®

2002 – Kathleen Williamson & Lisa Otey Duo appear on the  91.3 FM KXCI and TKMA    Tucson Folk Festival Highlights.  www.kxci.com   
2004 – Lisa Otey & the Desert Divas. Viva La Diva!  DVD and CD. Owl’s Nest     Productions®.

2004 – Kathleen Williamson. 91.3 KXCI Presents One Song at a Time. Foundation for    Creative Broadcasting.  www.kxci.com 

2005 – Melanie Morrison.  On the Inside.  Owl’s Nest Productions.        www.melaniemorrison.com 

2005 – Lullabies for New Beginnings. Compilation of Tucson Women Musicians non-profit   CD for New Beginnings for Women and Children. Exec. Producer Nancy     McCallion. Engineered by Duncan Hudson. www.cdbaby.com/cd/tucsonwomen .

SAMPLES
www.cdbaby.com/kwilliamson2
www.cdbaby.com/kwilliamson1
www.myspace.com/kathleenwilliamson

 

REVIEWS & News  (excerpts)

PUBLISHED ON JUNE 29, 2006: Sacred Spud wins TAMMIES Best New CD Release: 
Making a Scene: Kathleen Williamson battles evil-doers with a 'Sacred Spud' - By LINDA RAY
First, you should know that the sacred-heart-shaped potato on the cover of Kathleen Williamson's The Sacred Spud (Owl's Nest) is no joke.

Amateur art-photographer Williamson was inspired to make a series of reverent photos of the tuber after she found it, just like that, in an ordinary potato sack upon returning to Tucson from a trip to Ireland in 1996. She'd almost forgotten about that art project when it occurred to her that the image was the perfect bundle for a collection of songs she'd written about, as touted on her Web site, taking back "God, country ... (and country music!) from the evil-doers."

You may respond: "Oh, ick. A soapbox! I'd rather watch Celebrity Poker Showdown on the TiVo."

Point made, and taken, because for all of that, The Sacred Spud is also humorous (especially in the character development and plot twist of "She Was Playing Texas Hold 'Em"), self-effacing (as in "Don't Make a Scene, Kathleen," a warning perpetually falling on deaf ears) and ultimately oddly comforting. Williamson's empathy for her characters, cornered as they are by pop culture, is more than generous, and her "American Dream" actually celebrates the United States in terms of the diversity that she believes thrives here, especially in Tucson, as nowhere else in the world. Her set closer, "Thankful Way to Be," resolves her rage against the machine with a personal commitment to truth, simplicity and community.

"This is a post-Sept. 11 world," she notes, "and a lot of people today, of many different (generations), really are looking for a safe place, and where can we find a safe place when both the power structures and the anti-power structures are decentralized? Corporations are the power structures in the world now. That's the dominant paradigm, the new theology, the new governance."

She addresses that dilemma explicitly in "Lookin' for a Savior," a track which also features brilliant pedal steel highlights by the late Hal Rugg, a frequent collaborator.

Williamson considers that each Sacred Spud song is "someplace on a political spectrum," even the almost psychedelic "Diosa," a half-dream on a long night road, and "Keep It Faithful," which at first blush seems like a simple affirmation of commitment to a relationship.

"I think when you get into any integrity in any aspect of your life, you're starting to make a political choice, too," she says.

Sacred Spud's melodies and arrangements buttress Williamson's messages with identifiably American sounds. She concedes that her 2003 release, Love Is Best of All, was all over the globe stylistically. Because Sacred Spud's songs are about the state of America, she says, "This one, I tightened down more into an alt-country blues genre. It was really a conscious decision."

Rhythm & Views – Tucson Weekly February 2, 2006
By GENE ARMSTRONG
KATHLEEN WILLIAMSON - The Sacred Spud (Owl's Nest Productions)

With her heart divided between the honky tonk and the juke joint, Kathleen Williamson sure can be a character.

"Don't Make a Scene, Kathleen" is a basic blues progression--not unlike Muddy Waters' "Mannish Boy"--on top of which Williamson sings about herself in a wonderful, sassy tale of her lifetime proclivity to individualism and the tendency of those around her to squelch her fire.

That's just one of the charming and nonformulaic cuts on Williamson's latest CD, which seems to split its time between gentle, country-style lopes and bluesy rambles, aided and abetted by an all-star lineup of Tucson musicians, including Hal Rugg, Ed DeLucia, Lisa Otey and Ralph Gilmore.

Williamson is best when she defies convention and allows her subtle insights to infiltrate the listeners' consciousness. This is best illustrated when she realizes in "Looking for a Saviour" that the only person who's going to save her is herself, and on the hyper-drive folk of "Good Ole' Fashioned UnAmericana," in which she posits, "If Woody Guthrie were alive today / He wouldn't join your expensive nonprofit music organization."

Two-stepping nirvana is available in the tongue-in-cheek "She Was Playing Texas Hold 'Em," in which the protagonist loses a love to card-playing lust. In fact, much of The Sacred Spud is devoted to being alone. "Mean Mean Road" is about the curse and gift of getting by on one's own.

After the sometimes-wrenching journey, the closing track, the joyous gospel of "Thankful Way to Be," embraces the joy of being comfortable in one's own skin.

 ***************************

  • The Sacred Spud… evokes a number of early seventies songsmiths, Sandy Denny, for instance… Williamson has crafted several fine songs on The Sacred Spud, highlighted by tasteful arrangements and a solid production, and the album should appeal to those who appreciate eclectic singer-songwriters.  Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., All Music Guide
  • “Neo-traditional glory… ”  Cathalena Burch, Tucson Daily Star
  • What performer could hit all these different styles and blend them so seamlessly together? Kathleen Williamson. It is a complex background of influences and styles which lends Williamson’s set list such amazing diversity. Williamson’s style is so broad across the spectrum of genres there’s bound to be something everyone loves. Her new CD, “Love is Best of All,” features 10 incredible originals. It reflects her vast world experiences and eclectic musical expressions.Melesa Hamer - Flagstaff Live
  • "Combining world mysticism, soul, and jazz, Kathleen Williamson brings a new relevance to the word "eclectic." The title track harks back to George Harrison's sitar-tinged work; 'Secret Song' recalls Astrud Gilberto; and 'Big Deal Small Talk' combines funky guitar and rap. Love may be best of all, but genre hopping is lots of fun, too."SING OUT! MAGAZINE FALL 03
  • ...Her ability as a writer and the overall intelligence of pieces like "I Can See a New View" will convince many to keep listening... Love Is Best of All will also appeal to singer/songwriter aficionados bored by the typical product. ~  Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., All Music Guide
  • “Eclectic with a capital E” Kevin Smith, Arizona Daily Star
  • It's easy to run out of superlatives trying to describe Kathleen Williamson. She's as smart as a room full of Nobel Laureates, has a sly sense of humor, and is an uncommonly talented musician/singer/songwriter. She also loves to stretch her boundaries, which is one of the things that makes her new CD -- Love is Best of All (Owl's Nest Productions) -- so much fun. Williamson moves effortlessly between song styles on this album, working in genres as diverse as smooth jazz ("Secret Song"), Eastern ("Love is Best of All"), country ("The Stars Draw Near"), and gently rockin' blues ("I Didn't Know What I Was In For"). Scott Barker, Tucson Lifestyle, March 2003

 

  • Listening to the combination of folk, country, pop, jazz, novelty and blues, listeners may feel that they are stuck in the corner of a comfy pub with the coolest jukebox in town. Better still is that many of Kathleen Williamson’s songs, which frankly are too sophisticated and complex to become Top 40 hits, take on new and deeper meaning on repeated listening… This impeccably crafted work explores in beautiful symbolism…  restrained, awe-filled Americana. Beautiful, warm melodies make the perfect couch for Williamson’s dusky alto. Love is Best of All is a triumph for Williamson. Gene Armstrong, writer for  Tucson Weekly
  • Como reza el título "Love is best of all"(el amor es lo mejor de todo), en tiempos de distorsión social lo mejor es refugiarse en el amor. Kathleen nos ofrece un repertorio que va desde las influencias de George Harrison hasta el rap, pasando por el blues,country, hot-jazz y la canción lenta. Especialmente destacable la canción "I can See The New View" (merecedora de cualquier tipo de premio) que nos anima a reconstruir un mundo que se derrumba. Canciones para reir, llorar, soñar y bailar, con una estupenda producción y acompañada de grandes músicos interpretando un repertorio elaborado por Kathleen que recoge la evolución del mundo de la música en USA en las últimas décadas. Comprar el cd y tendréis un compendio de estilos musicales fabulosamente interpretados por una mujer que lleva la música en las venas. Santos Suárez, DJ at Radio Carcoma 107.9 FM, Madrid

  ”The Stigmata of St. William-zen” Cartoonist Dave Fitzsimmons, Arizona Daily Star

AWARDS

     TAMMIES 2006 – Tucson Area Music Awards BEST CD RELEASE, BEST SONGWRITER, BEST FOLK MUSICIAN, RUNNER UP BEST VOCALIST

          • ASCAPlus Award (American Society of Composers and Publishers)  206, 2005 and 2004The ASCAPlus is a cash award granted by ASCAP to support and encourage writers of serious music. The award is made by an independent panel of music scholars and professionals. It is based on the unique prestige value of each writer's catalog of original compositions and works performed substantially in media not typically surveyed by ASCAP.

          • TAMMIES 2003 - Tucson Area Music Awards   BEST SONGWRITER   BEST CD RELEASE   BEST UP-AND-COMING ARTIST   RUNNER UP BEST VOCALIST

          • Arizona Blues Showdown Champions 2003     Kathleen Williamson  & Lisa Otey (solo/duo division) Phoenix Blues Society.  

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE VENUES

Kathleen’s performances popular Arizona venues as well as regional and international festivals: the Tucson Folk Festival, the Tucson Blues Festival, The Tucson Jazz Society Primavera Festival, the Tucson Acoustic Blues Showcase, the Benson Blues Festival, Silver City Blues Festival, the Edmonton Jazz Society, the Marco Fume Blues Festival in Rosanno, Italy; the Jazz en Artois, Blues Sur Seine; Cognac Blues Passion; Boogie & Blues Night Schouwburg De Meerse in Hoofddorp, Netherlands; International Blues Challenge Memphis; Amy Goodman's Democracy Now!  Angie’s Nightclub in Tivoli Theatre, Hamburg; Flagstaff Pride Festival; Rialto Theatre, Tucson; Mesa Blues Blast; Sharlott Hall Museum Folk Music Festival; Charlie’s at the Weatherford, Flagstaff, AZ; Tempe Fall Festival of the Arts; Rythym Room in Phoenix; Folk Alliance- San Diego; Berger Center for the Performing Arts, Tucson; Temple of Music and Art, Tucson; Patagonia Music Festival; Fan Club Cruises; The Peace Fair, Tucson; Leo Rich Theater, Tucson; SEATTLE COFFEEHOUSE TOUR (El Diablo, Café Luna, Pegasus, Hotwire, Mr Chai’s, C&P Coffeehouse).   

   Photo Credit: Steve Stayton 2005  

 (photos in this file may be copied and enlarged for web or printing).

 

TUCSON WEEKLY:  COVER STORY PUBLISHED ON AUGUST 7, 2003:  

Hard Workin' Women (Excerpts)

By  GENE ARMSTRONG   

Williamson is a classic redheaded colleen with striking blue eyes. With her flowing mane of dark hair, tinged with a few stray grays of late, Otey's look is more that of a dark-eyed gypsy. The couple is equally comfortable discussing Radiohead, immigration laws, art, philosophy, literature and their favorite TV program, Xena: Warrior Princess.  

They also happen to be two of Tucson's busiest musicians--and most-honored. It was announced this week that, between them, Otey and Williamson won six of this year's Tucson Area Music Awards, aka the TAMMIES. 

© Photo by Kristen Giordano

Williamson was voted Tucson's top songwriter and upcoming artist (even though she has been performing since the 1970s) while her recent album, Love Is Best of All, got the nod as top new release. Otey topped the lounge music, keyboards player and female vocalist categories. Williamson also notched a runner-up mention in the latter division.  

Although Williamson spent much of the '70s and '80s as a folk-jazz guitarist and singer-songwriter in Jerome, Ariz., and various locales overseas, Williamson's day gig now is as a criminal defense attorney, and she keeps her office in a guesthouse in the backyard.  

Williamson has served time as a prosecutor and judge, and she holds a doctorate in cultural anthropology, giving her a unique perspective--that of an attorney, an academic and an artist--on legal affairs. And most of life, for that matter.  

"It's a tough time for civil rights and liberties," says Williamson, whose sense of justice and activism has been influenced greatly by such artists as Charles Dickens, Franz Kafka and Hoagy Carmichael, who all studied law.  

A FIRST-GENERATION IRISH-American native of New York City, Kathleen began performing at an early age, mounting skits with her three sisters when they were kids. She played with basement rock 'n' roll bands, and at open microphone events in Greenwich Village, writing songs of love and protest. Heavily influenced by contemporary folk, soul, jazz and rock music, she came out West in 1974 to play in the artists' community of Jerome and throughout the Verde Valley.  

In Arizona, Williamson studied with Katie Lee, her mentor and friend--and a renowned folk-music pioneer. She also collaborated in those days with the late Joe Wolverton, a jazz guitar virtuoso and teacher of Les Paul. She spent time touring in Japan, Guam, Hong Kong, Korea and Samoa. By 1986, Williamson was in Tucson, where she headlined the first Tucson Folk Festival. But soon her pursuit of academic degrees, such as a J.D. and a doctorate, began to occupy her time.  

Although she has been described as a folk-jazz artist, Williamson proves on Love Is Best of All to be far more versatile than that appellation might suggest. She has sometimes been called a "twisted torch singer."  

 

Williamson works a gauzy East Indian groove on the title track. "The Stars Draw Near" is a cantering country-bluegrass track, enlivened by an interlude than transforms from a polka to a Sinaloan brass-band sound. There's the jazz homage "Jazz Fiesta Show," on which she name-checks a couple dozen classic jazz artists and tunes.  

On her satirical, literate "Big Deal Small Talk" and "I Can't Make a Livin' Lovin' You," Williamson uses her sultry voice to talk-sing in a syncopated fashion that might otherwise be called, well, rap. But she's no bandwagon jumper when it comes to rhythmic wordplay. "I've been doing rap since 1980 because I was listening to Gil Scott-Heron."  

These days, Williamson loves to play with her partner, but she also maintains an ongoing collaboration with guitarist Ed Delucia and country combo with Delucia and steel-guitarist Hal Rugg.  

One of their first collaborations-- the gently optimistic "I Can See the New View"--appears on Williamson's new album. Another, the whimsical "Don't Make a Scene, Kathleen," is included on Otey's latest.  

 

© Photo by Kristen Giordano

 

   Photo by Deborah Monroe

   

  Kathleen Williamson and Kathy Bayley Recording the Sacred Spud at Duncan Stitt's Studio, Tucson, AZ  Photo by James Wood / ©Arizona Daily Star May 2005 

 

     
© Photo by Lisa Otey 2004                                                                                                   ©Photo by Steve Stayton 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sacred Spud TAMMIES TAMMIES AWARDS 2006 BEST CD,  BEST SONGWRITER, BEST FOLK  

 

 

  
cover: The Sacred Spud © 2005 Kathleen Williamson  

 

Performing songwriter, jurist, anthropologist, writer, photographer, artist, impurist, & provocateur

Taking Back God, Country, and Country Music from the Evil Doers!!!

The "Sacred Spud®" August 2005  New original music by Kathleen -  Musicians include the late Hal Rugg, Ed Delucia, Sabra Faulk, Ralph Gilmore, Steve Willis, Kathy Bayley, Lisa Otey, Todd Hammes and more.   

Available at: www.cdbaby.com/kwilliamson2

 

Sacred Spud® Productions 

 

 

 



1. Lookin’ for a Saviour – An upbeat Country Noir song with a vocal style that invokes Sandy Denny (according to reviewer Ronnie  Lankford, Jr. of allmusic.som). The mundane and profound interact in this song as the seeker longs for safety and love in songs, blue-green spaces and RVs. Features Hal Rugg on pedal steel and Lisa Otey on backup vocals. This song sets the philosophical introduction to the CD. 

           

          2. Don’t Make a Scene, Kathleen – A comical topical blues rocker
 about the archetypal and irreverent Kathleen type of shrew. 

          3. Shake the Demon – Hal Rugg’s haunting steel work compliments
 this song of love impossible to obtain in a life where an undermining
 mentality supersedes the heart. 

                    4. Goo4.  4. Good Ole’ Fashioned UnAmericana – A fun tribute to Woody
Guthrie and the many so-called patriotic UnAmericans who rise above commercialism and nationalism. 

          5. Mean Mean Road – Classic nasty death defyingly slow & beat-up
blues ala Stones meets Etta. 

          6. Brother, Can You Spare Ten Bucks – The 21st century updated
version of “Dime” hits all the blues funk corners of homelessness,
 addiction, failed medical and educational systems, and stigmatized
populations. The Native American chanting intercoursed with classic
 Pips shoop-shoop makes this commentary an R&B experience. 

          7. Texas Hold Em – Hilarious shit-kicking country music about the
 televised poker craze and gambling that has taken over the USA.

          8. Diosa – A unique love song with a symbolic songwriting style
 that evokes the dark and light sides of the three great American
 Jewish Guys: Dylan, Cohen, and Simon. Ed Delucia on guitars
adds both bright buoyancy as well as somber flamenco flavors. 

          9. Story of Isaac –  A cover of Leonard Cohen’s anti-religio/war
song about the sacrifice of children and humanity. Ralph Gilmore
 on drums concludes this with a beautiful death march. 

          10. My Hometown – An ironic uptempo carnivelesque Dory Previn
 type of arrangement about the fact of local Tucson and Americans’
 contributions to death and destruction in the Middle East. This song
was featured on Amy Goodman’s television and radio broadcast
of Democracy Now!

          11. Is It a Sin – A tender love song about the struggle between
 parting and staying together. 

          12. American Dream – a quick tempo road trip across the cultures
of the American landscape, danceable and optimistic. 

          13. Keep It Faithful – Lennonesque guidance on loving. 

          14.  Thankful Way to Be – Rollicking shake-it-up Gospel with
piano dynamite by Holland’s superman Mr. Boogie Woogie. 

 

 

 

 

love is best of all
TAMMIES AWARDS 2003 -  BEST NEW CD RELEASE & BEST SONGWRITER

 

   

love is best of all -  2003 Original music by Kathleen - Musicians include Lisa Otey (co-producer, piano, background vocals) the late Hal Rugg, Ed Delucia, Jon Westfall, Gillian Delear, The Flying Rosanno Triplets, Ed Friedland, Carla Brownlee, Todd Hammes, Pete Fine, Tucson Symphony String Quartet, Linda and Elise Ackerman, Steve Grams, Nancy McCallion, & more.  
Available at: www.cdbaby.com/kwilliamson

Sacred Spud® Productions 

 

“Listening to its combination of folk, country, pop, jazz, novelty and blues, listeners may feel that they are stuck in the corner of a comfy pub with the coolest jukebox in town. Better still is that many of Kathleen Williamson’s songs, which frankly are too sophisticated and complex to become Top 40 hits, take on new and deeper meaning on repeated listening.” Gene Armstrong, writer for Tucson Weekly. 

 

1. Love is Best of All – “The title track harks back to George Harrison's sitar-tinged work” – Sing Out Magazine. “The title cut lays her philosophy out in the plainest of terms. Compared to the universe, flashy airplanes, and high times, love is still the best thing the human race has going for it.” Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., All Music Guide

 

 

2. Secret Song – This Bossa Nova recalls Astrud Gilberto”
Sing Out Magazine. Sweet-tempered cocktail jazz with a
Brazilian lilt.

3. Big Deal Small Talk – night-clubbin’ rap/funk, a hilarious
rumination on those empty conversations of meaningless chatter
and the empty people who inhabit them. Although the music bops
and rolls, it also is infused by Lisa Otey’s salsa-style piano playing.
 Gene Armstrong. TW.

4. The Stars Draw Near is a jaunty, ambitious track that is
ostensibly a Western tune, but evolves into something greater.
While Williamson adopts a sweet, slightly updated version of
an Appalachian vocal melody, it’s filled with cool guest stars,
most notably music-biz veteran Hall Rugg, who contributes pedal
steel and Dobro, as well as the fabulous Rosanno Triplets on horns.
 This impeccably crafted work explores in beautiful symbolism a
longtime love and the forces that strive to divide it. And there’s a
 subversive musicological element in the way Williamson throws
 into the break a German polka followed by a mariachi interlude,
eventually bringing the two styles together in a rollicking finish.
Gene Armstrong, TW. 

5. I Can See the New View.  A contemporary/folk ballad - “an
 example of restrained, awe-filled Americana, juxtaposes the
immigrant experience with the aftermath of 9/11. Beautiful, warm
melodies make the perfect couch for Williamson’s dusky alto.”
Gene Armstrong, TW. “Her ability as a writer and the overall
 intelligence of pieces like "I Can See the New View" will
convince many to keep listening.” Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr.,
All Music Guide

6. Didn’t Know What I Was in For. A biographical Blues for
 Post-Modem generation recounting the scary and good themes
 of our times and the courage gained due to strong mom. 

7. Jazz Fiesta Show. A high-energy romp – composed for a jazz
 festival, in fact – that name-checks bundles of classic jazz tunes.
What could have been a throwaway novelty has become a joyful,
unself-conscious celebration and some pretty cool abstract poetry.
 Gene Armstrong. TW.

8. Sandpiper.  A fun Jazz up-tempo number on love based on
honesty and fun. 

9. I Can’t Make a Livin Lovin’ You. With Arrangements
 invoking Gil Scott Heron to Queen Latifah, an exploration
 of lower-socioeconomic realities that balances blues and hip-hop,
 as well as featuring potent saxophone and flute by
Hurricane Carla Brownlee.

10. An Hour to Maggie.  A Zen-Irish poetic ballad. 
Nancy McCallion on tin whistle, Kathleen on Bodhran.  

 

 


 [kgw1]visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics whiz, songwriter, guitarist

no depression

Katie Lee's writings

Katie_Lee.spud.apr.06.pdf

“Music is one thing. The music industry--ten thousand leagues away, where real music got drawn and quartered--is another. Yet in spite of the fuselage of rotten songs, one might, if lucky, hear melodies that honestly fit the words they sings about--not only fit,
but enhance, underline, punctuate, or soothe, and in rare cases, even add the subtlety intended.

Such a rare case will be found in Kathleen Williamson's
latest CD, The Sacred Spud. She tells her stories in the genre they belong in; blues, jazz, folk, rinkytink rhythms; and her words lean on you to listen, which is what storytelling is all about.

Kathleen's musical study and self-training far outstrips nine-tenths of the pro singer-songwriters today. I was around when she first picked up the guitar and know the various levels of
expertise she achieved, overstepped, and went on to form her own style. The stories are wonderful, but if you can't or won't listen
to the words, the music, the true heartbeat music, will grab your ass.”

Katie Lee
A once-upon-a-then Folksinger
April 06

Katie Lee is an Arizona, if not an international treasure. For more info on Katie Lee go to

http://myhero.com/myhero/hero.asp?hero=k_lee http://www.spaceagepop.com/leekatie.htm http://www.glencanyon.org/katielee/aboutkatielee.php http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/books/Content?oid=oid:59109